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There’s nothing wrong with this installment.  It’s tonally consistent with the rest of the series, the writing and illustrations are as good as you’d expect, and it feels like Batman ’66 Meets Steed and Mrs. Peel should.  There isn’t much to dislike here.  In fact, there isn’t much here period.

This is the briefest, breeziest installment of this series by far.  It chronicles the escapes of Batman and Peel along with Robin and Steed from their respective deathtraps, only to fall prey to another bit of trickery.  It’s a quick read to be sure, and a barely satisfying one at that.

Given that I don’t know what the numbers look like, I’m going to guess that most readers will pick this book up physically.  In that case, this makes a satisfying full issue with the excellent #9 digital installment.  As a single chapter, though, it doesn’t stand in its own.

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The joy and enjoyment comes from the smaller details.  When escaping, Robin gets a pretty solid moment of craftiness, and of course Batman has just the right gadget to get himself and Peel out of harm’s way.

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Edginton and Smith even throw in a nice callback to the Londinium trilogy of episodes in the series to take us into the penultimate installment.  Like I said before, there’s nothing particularly bad about this installment,  it’s just very lean.

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There are worse ways to spend a buck, but if you’re new to the series this isn’t the best jumping on point.

Recommended if:

  • You’ve read this book to this point.

Overall: Perfectly fine, though its enjoyability is due more to the series’ reputation than its own content.  I liked what was there, there just wasn’t much there.

SCORE: 6/10