What’s this?

Another LEGO set review, this time appraising George Barris’ beautifully bombastic and bewilderingly breathtaking Batmobile?

A set that sees those two arch-fiends, the Caped Crusader and the Clown Prince of Crime, locked in miniature melee?

What wonders will we uncover in the construction of the classic car?  Read on to find out, fellow champions of justice, as those fine friends at the LEGO Group have provided us with such a set.

Alright, going full Desmond Doomsday is fun but hard, so that’s enough of that.

…for now.  LEGO have indeed provided us with another Batman set for review, this time electing to go the classic route with the Batman Classic TV Series Batmobile.  It’s known that I am all about Batman ‘66, so I was really looking forward to this set, and friends?  Let me tell you: it does not disappoint.

Containing 345 pieces, the set also includes Batman and Joker Minifigures, along with a genuinely surprising extra piece I’ll get to in a moment.

Batman looks appropriately Westian, complete with ruffled collar under the cape, nose and eyebrow highlights on the cowl, and a wry smile befitting the Bright Knight of the classic television series.

Joker, meanwhile, is decked out in Cesar Romero’s more washed out purple and green, and yes, he has mustache stubble poking through his white makeup.    I would expect nothing less.

Once you start construction on the actual Batmobile, the instructions have you put together a rounded piece that kind of confused me for a while.  I mean, it kind of looked like it could have been part of the Batmobile’s undercarriage, I suppose?  But no, it wasn’t part of the car at all.

It was a base.

A base that turns.

Yes, this Batmobile is meant to be displayed in all its magnificence, complete with a “plaque” containing details of the car.

That’s kind of incredible.

Last week, in the cowl review, I said that there are some LEGO sets that are a joy to put together, and others that provide relief only once they’re finished. This is firmly in the former category, as I had a blast seeing the second greatest Batmobile of all time come together before my eyes.

The chassis is fairly simple, but there are lots of small pieces that help capture the car’s groovy, eccentric flair.  Short, angled pieces are layered together to make the iconic fins, and there are even parachutes on the rear bumper, fun “ROCKETS” and “MONITOR” consoles, and even a Batphone for direct contact with Commissioner Gordon at Gotham PD headquarters.

There are long stretches where the piece looks strange, almost making you wonder how it’s going to come together in the end.  The Batmobile has such a dynamic, striking silhouette, which can be difficult to see with a largely rectangular build.

But come together it does, as the cleverly designed elements and pieces nail the look of the vehicle.

Once completed, it has a ton of playability, with twin stud launchers mounted on the hood, a twin-seat cockpit for the Dynamic Duo, responsive rolling wheels, and even a hinged trunk for storing spare ammo and Batarangs.

Really, though, it’s all about the display ability of the piece.  One final surprise was the fact that the stud launchers could be removed, with some additional bricks used to cover up the rest of the hood for a sleeker, more accurate finish.  As fun as the launchers can be, the car just looks better without them, so I was pleasantly surprised to find out they were optional.

Because, really, look at this thing.

Set your atomic batteries to power, turbines to speed, and race to the store to get one for yourself.  You won’t be disappointed, chums.

Overall: There’s hardly a more recognizable and beloved vehicle in all of popular culture than the ‘66 Batmobile, and this set lets you construct your own without breaking the bank.  Retailing at around $30, it’s a very affordable set, though some dealers have them on back order for several weeks to months.  It has a ton of playability, and looks just great displayed on the accompanying base, making it a perfect set for kids and collectors alike.